Ages 14-21: Post-Secondary Education & Vocational Training



Think College!, an online resource for students with intellectual disabilities, lists college programs for students with ID. If you do not have a program in your area, Think College! provides tips for starting post-secondary education opportunities for students with disabilities.When your child turns 18, s/he has the option to:

  • Graduate and continue in the school district’s high school transition program until age 21. Remaining in a high school transition program until age 21 offers the benefit of a guided transition to adult life, a bridge to adult services, and the development of independent living skills.
  • Graduate and exit the K-12 system. Often, individuals who leave high school at age 18 have been discouraged from staying due to level of disability and/or lack of support, but some choose to seek post-secondary or vocational training independently (or with help

Whether your son or daughter chooses to stay in school or exit at age 18, post-secondary educational and vocational opportunities exist for all adults, regardless of age or ability.

Most community colleges offer courses for credit or audit that enhance employability and life skills. Some-such as the Occupational and Life Skills at Bellevue College or the PACE services at Community Colleges of Spokane-offer specifically designed programs for students with developmental disabilities. Other colleges find ways to help students with disabilities integrate into existing classes.

Think College!, an online resource for students with intellectual disabilities, lists college programs for students with ID. If you do not have a program in your area, Think College! provides tips for starting post-secondary education opportunities for students with disabilities. (visit website)

Whether it’s learning a trade, developing job skills, or pursuing personal interests, post-secondary education builds self-esteem, increases chances of employment and creates a more inclusive community.



2017

  • Newsletter


  • Create a vision for the future. Set goals. Identify helpful people and needed supports.
    Let Your Person Centered Planning Guide help you plan and prepare for each stage of life.

  • Informing Families is a partnership for better communication, provided by the Washington State Developmental Disabilities Council in collaboration with the Washington State Developmental Disabilities Administration and other partners throughout the state.