Community First Choice



Printable Bulletin

Another big change that’s been in the works for more than a year has recently been put into place. Effective July 1st, 2015, nearly everyone who had been receiving personal care through a waiver or Medicaid Personal Care (MPC) is now receiving personal care through a new Medicaid state plan called Community First Choice (CFC).

If you are currently receiving personal care services, there is nothing you need to do to get onto the new program; however, there are some new services included in CFC that you can request (now, or at your annual assessment).*

Community First Choice LogoCore CFC Benefits*

  • Personal Care
    Assistance, supervision and/or cueing with Activities of Daily Living (ADLs), Instrumental Activities of Daily Living (IADLs), and health-related tasks, due to functional disability. See below for examples of ADLs and IADLs.
  • Relief Care
    Allows the individual to hire alternate personal care providers.
  • Nurse Delegation
    A licensed registered nurse assigns specific nursing task(s) to a certified person to perform under the nurse’s direction and supervision.
  • Skills Acquisition Training
    ADLs, IADLs, and health-related skills-training to help the individual gain independence in those areas. Skills acquisition can be accessed through personal care hours or purchased as an enhanced service.
  • Personal Emergency Response System (PERS)
    A basic electronic device that enables individuals to secure help in an emergency.
  • Caregiver Management Training  
    Individuals will be offered the opportunity to receive training materials on how to select, manage, and dismiss their care providers. Training will be available in booklet, DVD, and web-based formats to both participants and their chosen representatives.

*number of service credits/hours based on assessment

Enhanced CFC Benefits*

  • Assistive Technology (AT)
    Devices and apps that increase the individual’s independence. Includes specialized add-ons to the basic PERS system such as fall detectors, medication reminders, and GPS locators for those who qualify.
  • Additional Skills Acquisition Training
    May be purchased along with, or instead of, assistive technology.
  • Community Transition Services
    Rent and utility deposits, bedding, basic kitchen supplies, and other expenses related to transitioning from a long term care facility (such as nursing home, hospital or RHC) to a person’s own home in the community.

*$500 combined annual limit for AT and additional Skills Acquisition Training.
*$850 one time expenditure for Community Transition

ADLs and IADLs

Activities of Daily Living (ADLs) include: bathing, bed mobility, body care, medication management, eating, dressing, locomotion, personal hygeine, use of toilet, and transfers.

Instrumental Activities of Daily Living (IADL) is incidental to the provision of ADL assistance and includes: meal preparation, ordinary housework, essential shopping, and travel to medical services.

*A small number of individuals (roughly 400) receive personal care through a waiver, but do not meet financial eligibility criteria for CFC. In order to remain on a waiver and continue to receive personal care through CFC, they must receive a monthly waiver service. We are in the process of gathering more information on what these individuals can request as a monthly waiver service (and continue to receive personal care through CFC). In the meantime, talk to your case manager about what will best meet your family member’s needs. We will follow up with more information as it becomes available.

Wait…There’s more!

Watch Jaime Bond, CFC Program Manager explain the new services and opportunities for independent living that CFC offers. Hosted by Ed Holen and Sue Elliott.



2017

News

Updated on Oct/05/2015

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